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# Title Date Semester Author Description Access Restrictions
1 Artivism on the Frontera: Cultural Production and Hybrid Borderlands: Society, Economy and Culture on the U.S.-Mexico Border 2016 Spring Alamillo, Adriana Kuri The U.S.-Mexico border is a platform for art activism by Border Artists whose goal is to create a society that views hybridity of culture...
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The U.S.-Mexico border is a platform for art activism by Border Artists whose goal is to create a society that views hybridity of culture, race, and practice as a positive trait rather than a threat. Analyses of the border as a fraught zone of international and intercultural contact reveal culturally blended 'borderlands' that operate under the effects of racial and economic power structures. I explore these borderlands as a physical and conceptual space for creation, in which artists become performers of a dual role as cultural producers and activists. The formulation of the border as a society and cultural terrain rather than a boundary line destabilizes its essential exclusionary nature. This allows for the creation of Border Art that purposefully acts as political strategy meant to generate conversation, change attitudes towards immigration, and perform the presence of those without formal political capital.
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2 Chicago Makes Salt 2016 Spring Granados, Sabrina Chicago Makes Salt focuses on the micro history of salt production through a study of the Chicago based company Morton Salt. As a known...
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Chicago Makes Salt focuses on the micro history of salt production through a study of the Chicago based company Morton Salt. As a known foundational mineral to the chemical industry, and one of the raw materials of aluminum and glass, salt has been critical to the development of Chicago. Unlike previous accounts of the city, which place industrialists and architects at the forefront of history, this thesis - through an analysis of Spout (Morton's company news- paper), the U.S. Bureau of Mines annual reports, and an examination of Morton's corporate headquarters -presents salt as the essential element for building urban infrastructure.
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3 The Trois Grandes Dames of Impressionism: Marie Bracquemond, Berthe Morisot, and Mary Cassatt Conducting their Careers in Nineteenth Century France 2014 Spring Lensink, Sarah Hawkins Marie Bracquemond, Berthe Morisot, and Mary Cassatt were called Les Trois Gran des Dames of Impressionism. Each conducted her career in...
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Marie Bracquemond, Berthe Morisot, and Mary Cassatt were called Les Trois Gran des Dames of Impressionism. Each conducted her career in nineteenth century France, when the Napoleonic code placed heavy restrictions on women's rights, popular opinion considered women incapable of genius, bourgeois social codes restricted social mobility, and the church declared it women's sacred duty to become wives and mothers. This study clarifies the parameters in which these three women worked toward their ambitions, legally and socially. This thesis also explores each woman's artistic training, involvement with the impressionists, personal life, and her response to the challenges of combining these many aspects of life.
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4 Gulam Rasool Santosh: A Lover of the Feminine Divine 2016 Spring Higgins, Joyce Joy This thesis examines the art of Gulam Rasool Santosh, who worked during the historical moment when Indian artists were striving to...
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This thesis examines the art of Gulam Rasool Santosh, who worked during the historical moment when Indian artists were striving to establish an indigenous post-colonial identity. Santosh's art exemplifies the Neo-Tantric movement that began in the 1960s. By incorporating geometric and figurative abstraction, his art established a unique articulation of lndian modernity. It will be argued that his work functions not only as artwork, but also as ritual object. A study of the artist as Tantric practitioner and poet demonstrates the influence of Tantric philosophy and imagery on his work which embodies Tantra's esoteric/mystical meaning. Through this analysis, I propose that a direct encounter and experience of Santosh's work initiates transformation of the viewer's inner consciousness towards higher human evolution.
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5 Beyond Princess Peach: Gender Issues and the Boy's Club Hegemony of Video Game Development 2014 Spring Gitelman, Emily Rose Video games have been part of the cultural landscape for over forty years. They are mirrors of our society--particularly, of our society...
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Video games have been part of the cultural landscape for over forty years. They are mirrors of our society--particularly, of our society's attitude towards women and sexuality. The "gamespace" is a gendered, masculine space wherein women have been traditionally reduced to sexist tropes or excluded altogether by way of the virtual camera and oversexed, objectified female characters. The often-hostile masculinity of the gamespace bleeds into the real world, influencing gamer culture and the treatment of real women. In this paper the representation of gender in games is examined through a feminist lens, with the intention of making clear the existence of sexism and misogyny in the industry, as well as encouraging progressive reform of the treatment of gender and sexuality within the gaming industry and surrounding culture.
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6 The Book Should be Wind: Arienti, Pujol, Epaminonda and Cramer and the Issue of the Library 2014 Spring Giulianotti, Chiara Since antiquity until the present day libraries (1) have been treasured as paramount spaces of cultural heritage and knowledge-making...
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Since antiquity until the present day libraries (1) have been treasured as paramount spaces of cultural heritage and knowledge-making across cultures. In this thesis I present and investigate the work of contemporary artists who have engaged with the notion of the library and printed culture, to reflect on the agency of the library as ideological archive or to challenge the promises of contemporary networks of information-and-knowledge making. (1) Library, in its traditional definition as place of books' collection and archiving.
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7 Gisan's Paintings as Souvenirs for Western Visitors in Late 19th Century Korea 2014 Spring Moon, Jung Jung Gisan produced many paintings that were popular among the foreign visitors in the late 19th century. Gisan was successfully producing...
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Gisan produced many paintings that were popular among the foreign visitors in the late 19th century. Gisan was successfully producing illustrations of Korea for western audiences. Gisan's paintings become popular in Korea in the 1980s when they rediscovered by folklorists who saw them as illustrative of life in Korea during the Joseon dynasty, but we need to be careful of placing too much weight on these assertions of authenticity because the work was intended as a western souvenir. Gisan's paintings are not faithful representations of Korea because Gisan had to interpret the westerners' taste, and also his paintings were not meant to be documentation. Gisan's paintings are the result of real communication between Gisan and the westerners, and Gisan's efforts to see his own land through foreigners' eyes.
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8 Freak Bikes and the Art of Sharing 2014 Spring Werling, Joey (Joanne) The Freak Bike is a craft that is propelled by a desire to create a surreal experience within the real. The Freak Bike is a machine, born...
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The Freak Bike is a craft that is propelled by a desire to create a surreal experience within the real. The Freak Bike is a machine, born from the basic geometry of a bicycle, which has been cut up, reconfigured, and then welded or brazed back together. Much like the bicycle it is capable of hauling cargo, tackling tricky terrain, and has proven itself to be an efficient means of transport. My personal experience with the Freak Bike has been one of great adventure; this document serves as a formal analysis of the Freak Bike but also as an analysis of my experience with the bike, primarily in Chicago and California. With a society that is made up of one part people, one part cement, one part steel, and one part landfill the Freak Bike makes sense in many ways. The Freak Bike rises from the ruble, much like the phoenix from the flame. What one could have previously considered a discarded or unusable bicycle takes on a whole new life. It goes from trash to party machine, literally. These freaky bicycles are used for the art of celebration; they enhance the celebratory experience by highlighting the absurdity that is possible within the real. This device takes its viewer beyond the norm; it gives the viewer an extraordinary view of how the streets could look.
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9 Sound as Flux 2017 Spring Gamboa, Guido In the 20th century, developments in music separated sound from artistic intention and allowed it to yield to chance processes. Through...
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In the 20th century, developments in music separated sound from artistic intention and allowed it to yield to chance processes. Through the analysis of Leif Brush and Manfred Werder, I show that this way of conceiving sound privileges becoming over being, process over product and chance over intention. Language, system and intention are substituted by chance, flux and the dynamism of the world itself. These artists argue that this is the most viable source of artistic creativity.
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10 The Transition of Radical Dance Practices to Performance Art 2014 Spring Gomez-Misserian, Alessandra Maria I intend to answer the question, can there be radical movement practices within Dance or can these practices only exist within a...
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I intend to answer the question, can there be radical movement practices within Dance or can these practices only exist within a Performance Art discourse? Dance's identity is ontologically associated with a being-in-flow, and is isomorphic to, variable arrangements of movement developed over the course of history. Its purview is traditionally defined by configured bodies, aesthetic value, prescribed technique and the intoxication of internal power; the animation of the body thriving in mid-air. Dance companies are privatized, further ossifying the future of dance. Contemporary artists/movers (Sarah Michelson, Goat Island, and Jerome Bel) have joined the legacy of 1960's figures such as Simone Forti, Yvonne Rainer and Trisha Brown. Within a performance art discourse, are the subjects 'performing dance' or dancing? I continually return to a powerful question posed by Jerome Bel, "how do I produce a show without dance?" (1) (1) Kristin Hohenadel, "Nondances That Spur Critics to Brawl and Audiences to Sue," The New York Times, March 20th, 2005, http://www.nytimes.com/2005/03/20/arts/dance/20hohe.html?pagewanted=print&position= (accessed April 1, 2014)
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11 Who can be the Expert? Chinese Contemporary Curators 2014 Spring Fang, Ariel As China's art scene continues expanding, condensed and dizzying in the speed of developments, it is high time to take a critical look at...
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As China's art scene continues expanding, condensed and dizzying in the speed of developments, it is high time to take a critical look at those at the forefront of the Chinese cultural strata. This thesis is geared to analyze the qualitative structure of what constitutes an individual as a Chinese contemporary curator. Active from 1980's to the present day individuals Li Xianting, Gao Minglu, Hou Hanru, and Fan Di'an all are "gatekeepers" of the Chinese art world. By tracing their progression from an independent curator, to international curator, and finally the expert curator, a discursive understanding of Chinese contemporary curatorial in the present moment is possible. This comprehension in turn benefits a larger discussion of Chinese contemporary art in general.
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12 Jewishness in the Art of Hannah Wilke and Anita Steckel 2017 Spring Pockrass, Ally Hannah Wilke and Anita Steckel are two Jewish artists from the Feminist Art Movement, who have been minimally discussed in respect to...
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Hannah Wilke and Anita Steckel are two Jewish artists from the Feminist Art Movement, who have been minimally discussed in respect to their use of Jewish content. This thesis utilizes post-Holocaust memory theory to look at how these artists approached Jewish subject matter, while also investigating the intersections of sexuality, Jewish identity, New York, and feminism in Wilke and Steckel's work. By analyzing their art from the lens of Jewishness, I argue that we gain a more complex understanding of their work.
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13 The Contemporary American Slasher: Breaking Down and Rebuilding the Genre Through Violence 2014-2015 2015 Spring Prendergast, Sarah This thesis describes the evolution of the slasher horror film from its classic manifestation to its contemporary interpretation. It does...
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This thesis describes the evolution of the slasher horror film from its classic manifestation to its contemporary interpretation. It does so by analyzing classic slasher characteristics, postmodern films of the 1990's, torture porn in the early 2000's, and the present depiction of classic formulas. I argue that the way violence is portrayed in contemporary slashers is related to American television consumption and media portrayals of violence and torture in both crime and war. Through this analysis I conclude that, in a time of economic prosperity, like the 1990's, the need for violent horror is less necessary or popular and that in times of war or increased nationalism like that of post-9/11 America, the need for violent horror is very popular and successful.
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14 All Day I Dream About Situationists 2015 Spring Gloster, Jeremy This thesis is only viewable on the SAIC campus.
15 Collateral Damage: Architecture in Global Conflict and the Inefficacy of American Policy 2015 Spring Swanson, Patti Jean In World War II, the United States created the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives division (the so-called "Monuments Men") of the Allied...
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In World War II, the United States created the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives division (the so-called "Monuments Men") of the Allied Forces in a highly effective attempt to safeguard European art and architecture from the devastating effects of the war. This paper looks at how American efforts to protect architecture in global conflict have developed over time, and how successful they have proved to be since the era of the Monuments Men. By analyzing two modern case studies where noteworthy architecture was ruthlessly damaged by American forces -- one each from the Vietnam and Iraq Wars -- this paper illustrates the flaws in current American legislation, and serves as a call to action. Although not all architecture can be protected as long as we continue to wage war, Americans today need to recognize the importance of preserving architectural heritage, and find more effective ways to hold their military accountable for its destruction.
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16 New Narratives: Pushpamala N 2015 Spring Chaman, Jyotsna For over a decade Pushpamala N has used photography both as a medium and as a way to explore a socio-political context for her work. She...
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For over a decade Pushpamala N has used photography both as a medium and as a way to explore a socio-political context for her work. She has done this by questioning photography's symbolic role as well as its construction of female identities from The British Raj to India's thriving commercial media today. Pushpamala retraces and reevaluates the function of female representation in India, be it for male imperialistic and domineering eyes or modern consumers and in doing so, she reconstructs and then intelligently reimagines it Pushpamala's genius is that she presents an alternative narrative to India's historical and present day records of women representation that make the viewer question the image's veracity. While drawing on the conventions of self-portraiture, the Bangalore-based artist inserts herself into the frame as the subject What stands out from Pushpamala's work is the use of photography to critique photography. Her work is an unending engagement with mimesis and masquerade, as both foci of revelation and concealment As can be seen in Pushpamala's continuous juggling of vantage positions, -from mimicking a Toda woman, or Bharat Mata (Mother India) to an image of actress-turned politician Jayalalitha with a whip in hand and a rather rebellious appearance -- ideological fancies gradually arise only to reveal their hidden awkward truths, as is discussed in my paper in regard to some of the artist's seminal photo-performances from the series The Native Women of South India (2000-2004) completed in collaboration with British photographer, Clare Arni. While critiquing the pretense of the camera, Pushpamala N projects ironic makeovers of the mythological, religious, celebratory and ordinary women of India. Through this she explores and implodes Indian national identity as well as female stereotyping that has grown out of the colonial identity of the Other over the years. She mines several photographic histories to understand the "construction of the self, and perhaps more broadly, a construction of national identity."i She effortlessly draws upon a range of cultural markers to perform and exhibit different personas through which she is able to reveal the artifice and restrictions of photography itself that have helped create national identity and stereotypes over the years. I talk in detail, in addition to a few other works, about her mimesis of colonial anthropometric photography of Andamanese people (see fig.l) by Maurice Vidal Portman (c. 1890) by the artist in the short series titled The Ethnographic Series from the 'Native Women' project. Pushpamala restores the Indian woman to her historicity, unquestionably marked by decades of colonial submission. In Pushpamala's revisit to these anthropometrical photographs and colonial ethnography, she constructs a "candid critique of anthropology as a colonial discipline that intrumentalizes colonial bodies."ii The rather hypnotic checkered backdrop imitates the backdrop in Portman's photographs as a dystopic tool while Pushpamala mimics the "native" as a pinned-up specimen -- an "object" of scientific investigation. The checkered background measures the subject's height and span. Two hands extend from beyond the frame of the image that support the backdrop from either side, just as they are seen in Portman's photograph. The subject faces forward, like she does in Portman's image, with the right arm extended outward, perpendicular to the frame, resting on a stand. In The Ethnographic Series, Pushpamala borrows the "native" characters from colonial anthropometric photographs and renders them as "samples" of her own mock anthropological study. Though photography goes as far back as the 16th century's camera obscura projects, it was not until British colonialism that photographers introduced their technology to the Indian subcontinent. Camera became an authoritative tool to record and document people, events and landscapes. "While the first commercial photographers set out as early as the 1840s, most explorers travelled with a camera from the 1870s [ ... ] These photographs did not so much represent the experienced reality as they reflected the Western views of the colonial world, which was often shaped by travel writers and artists. To fulfill audience expectations of the exotic, photographers would hire actors to create idealized, romanticized photographs."iii Pushpamala refers to the colonial British obsession with ethnographic documentation, vividly bringing to mind Portman's infamous ethnographic series of photographs of the aboriginal people in Andaman Islands and further challenges its authenticity. Pushpamala's series on the 'Native Women' comprise of 250 photographs; the series centers on representations of women in historical and contemporary visual culture, while noticeably imitating the style of 19th century compilations. These imitations directly and indirectly reference colonial ethnographic photography, "colonial" paintings by Indian artist Raja Ravi Varma (1848-1906), a 16th century Deccani miniature and images of women in popular culture. "Placing herself in the role of subject, Pushpamala recreates the colonial sepia-toned gaze and its power relations while looking back at a viewer who must acknowledge that such photography cannot ultimately lead to knowledge of the subject or even a "type" she is meant to represent."iv Pushpamala's reiterations of canonical images place brackets around their source images, highlighting both the source images and their photographic imitations as fundamentally performative actions. The stereotypes these images reference are drained of static value and substance and in its place, become discursive and loose products, with specific histories. Nevertheless, given the use of decoratively painted backdrops, costumes and props, the artist also evokes the "practice of small town studio photography, wherein the photograph functions less as the indexical trace of a stable presence than as an occasion for playful and imaginative self-realization and transformation."v As Pushpamala executes her photo-performances, it is such that she makes available her performed photographs to the viewer but not available as a 'photographer.' She performs in it but not available as a performer outside of that position. She explores "types" and identities but she is not an anthropologist. And she takes indefinite advantage of her position as the artist to surface questions and concerns that are not necessarily talked about in India but that call for urgent attention. Notes: i "Performance Photographer Pushpamala N Speaks on "Pseudo-Archive" October 27", Watkins College of Art, Design & Film Nashville TN, October 13, 2014, accessed December 20, 2014 http:/ fwww.watkins.edufperformance-photographer-pushpamala-n/ ii Gayatri Sinha and Parul Dave Mukherji, "PUSHPAMALA N.- Self in Stills, Conflict within the Frame," In Voices of Change: 20 Indian Artists, New Delhi: Marg Foundation, 2011 iii Ulrike Bessel, 2015 "Seeing Colonialism through Photographs" Royal Engineers Museum Blog, accessed March 29 http:/ fwww.re-museum.co.uk/blogfseeing-colonialism-through-photographs/ iv "Gund Gallery 1 Kenyon College" 2015, accessed March 29 http:/ fwww.thegundgallery.org/2013/04/do-it/ v Murtaza Vali, "ELUDING PRESENCE: PORTRAITURE IN CONTEMPORARY SOUTH ASIAN PHOTOGRAPHY", Eluding Presence: Portraiture in South Asian Photography, http:/ I quod.lib.umich.edu/tftap /79 77 5 73.0002.109 I --eluding-presence-portraiture-insouth- Asian photography?rgn=main;view=fulltext (accessed October 18, 2014)
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17 American Variety Postmodernism 2015 Spring Guardalabene, Peter Francis In an attempt to situate contemporary American art and culture in relation to society, this thesis proposes that the emergence of...
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In an attempt to situate contemporary American art and culture in relation to society, this thesis proposes that the emergence of identity politics led to the disintegration of a concept of a dominant hegemonic America. Because of identity politics, a single vision of America (if one ever existed) is fractured and in its place, a splintering of community occurs, which postmodern critics speak of as pluralism. This thesis traces an arc from single, unified, understanding of American culture, through pluralism (which in effect offered solidarity within those splintered communities) to the current further atomization of art, beyond identity politics and seemingly beyond politics in general. Craig Owens, Fredric Jameson, David Harvey and others define the ineffectuality of pluralism as "fatal" based on an anxiety of a lingering notion of teleological progression. This thesis takes as its case study the 1993 and 2014 Whitney Biennials. 1993, it may be argued, was the moment when postmodernism was institutionalized and marginalized communities with like allegiances made themselves visible in the museum. 2014, by contrast, marked the moment of atomized, individualized cultural production, with little commonality and little overarching political stance. This disintegrating trajectory raises questions about what art has gained or lost in this process.
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18 Under the Gavel: India by Christie's 2015 Spring Shah, Sneha Vijay Christie's is recognized for its rich sales history of important western art collections and objects, in this glamour - its longstanding...
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Christie's is recognized for its rich sales history of important western art collections and objects, in this glamour - its longstanding connections to colonial exhibitions, imperialism and the East are often overlooked. Through critical studies of accessible Christie's catalogues, press, and documented literature on James Christie and the auction house, this thesis argues Christie's role as a tastemaker and its hand in repackaging the visual identity of India, redistributing plundered antiquities, and developing a market for "Indian" objects in the West. Beginning in the 1760's, the paper draws a connection between Christie's founding and the colonization of India; focusing on sales in the 1800's it considers historical performance at auction as means to understand the evolution of the Indian Art Market.
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19 A Perspective on the Phulkari and Bagh Practices of Punjab 2015 Spring Young, Jessica Mordine This thesis is only viewable on the SAIC campus.
20 Form Without Context: Traditional Japanese Architecture's Influence on Modernism 2015 Spring Pauldine, Angela In the modern era of European and American architecture, architects took inspiration from traditional Japanese architecture. The presence...
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In the modern era of European and American architecture, architects took inspiration from traditional Japanese architecture. The presence of this influence in modern architecture has since largely characterized the Western interpretation of Japanese architecture. Certain ideals within traditional Japanese architecture served as confirmation of the modernists' ideals -- open planning through post and beam construction, simplicity through the stripping away of nonessentials, and harmony with the natural environment -- and have roots in the values and beliefs of Shinto and Buddhism. Because the modern architects lacked an understanding of the religious significances and intentions, the borrowings were often reduced to form. In this thesis, the historical religious contexts of those Japanese architectural forms and principles that influenced the modern architects are examined in order to fill a gap in our interpretation of traditional Japanese architecture.
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