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# Title Semester Author Contributors Description Access Restrictions
1 She Goes Off in All Directions 2018 Spring Wickham, Celia Elizabeth This thesis is only viewable on the SAIC campus.
2 Together Feeling: Sympathy throughout Quantum Mechanics and Traditional Chinese Medicine 2016 Spring Stokes, Monica This thesis seeks to define sympathy as a process for study. These systems necessitate a closeness of participating entities. Through...
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This thesis seeks to define sympathy as a process for study. These systems necessitate a closeness of participating entities. Through intimate inquiry, sympathetic systems can be examined through an assemblage of several, diverse components of communication. By way of Quantum Mechanics and Traditional Chinese Medicine, this thesis aims to understand the communicative interactions between participating particles, organs, and bodies. The importance of understanding the sympathetic or "together feeling" is to better investigate the intimate subtleties that define our relationship to our own body, our relationship to other bodies, and the relationship of bodies to all forms of condensed matter. One way to trace sympathetic systems is through the intimate form of mimesis. The communicative aspects between the particle to particle relationship, organ to organ relationship, and body to body relationship can be explored through mimicry. Mimesis enables the close interaction of participating entities, allowing for a "together feeling." As a process, "together feeling" supports a space for observing the interconnectivities within and throughout the studied. To develop a systematic inquiry into sympathy or "together feeling," one can begin by understanding systems that use processes of sympathy as modes of investigation. This phenomenon can be approached through Quantum Mechanics and Traditional Chinese Medicine as a means of exploration. A movement towards sympathetic understanding is to find processes to maximize efficiency of investigation within mimesis, as well as find other ways to study sympathy beyond the process of mimicry.
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3 The Big Shocker: Investigating Identity in 'The Bad Seed' Through Death, Censorship, and Cuteness 2016 Spring Kuklenski, Renee This thesis focuses on the 1956 film The Bad Seed and reframes its self-proclaimed identity as a shocking motion picture in the context...
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This thesis focuses on the 1956 film The Bad Seed and reframes its self-proclaimed identity as a shocking motion picture in the context of its advertising, the role censorship played in the film's creation, and the two versions that preceded it: the original 1954 novel by William March and Maxwell Anderson's 1956 Broadway play. In particular, I focus on child murderess Rhoda Penmark's punishments in the film--electrocution and spanking-as evidence of and as responses to midcentury regulatory pressures on the film industry. Through an investigation of censorship and the Motion Picture Production Code, I consider why the circumstances of Rhoda's death were worth showing to audiences in a time when there were explicit regulations on visual representations of violence-particularly violence against children. I argue that Rhoda's unique demise in the film is evidence of the Production Code Administration's willingness to shape and mold The Bad Seed around the Code. Due to this close relationship with the regulatory agency, this "shocking" motion picture is anything but that. As an extension of this discussion of duplicity, I highlight the aspects of Rhoda's character across the novel, play, and film that conform to midcentury expectations of cuteness and girlhood and those that defy them. Ultimately, I use The Bad Seed to explore ideas of representation and identity, both through the film's plot and character development and as these themes pertain to the film's larger identity in a cultural context.
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4 Preppers and Conspiracy Theorists Online and IRL 2016 Spring Kyle, Camille Mason In this thesis, I explore the trend in conspiracy theory guided survivalism. I access this research via my own family history of family...
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In this thesis, I explore the trend in conspiracy theory guided survivalism. I access this research via my own family history of family members who lived "off the grid." By comparing and contrasting my contemporary case studies with the 1960s/70s countercultural movements that have influenced my family I seek new insights. In the first section, and in congruence with these cultural developments there were also technological ones, most importantly, the development of the Internet. The Internet is a technology, which is simultaneously despised, feared and utilized by the Internet entrepreneurs in my case studies: Alex Jones and The Survival Mom. How does this relationship function as an example of the difficulty decision making in the face of unknown possibilities? I utilize these conspiracy theory and prepper entrepreneurs to further differentiate between paranoid affect and paranoid practices. I also explore the concept of home and technological development within the home. Technologies often originate for military use and are then integrated into the public sphere. Conspiracy theorists believe that tracing back to origin points is the key to truth but it is more complicated than that. I come to the conclusion that many preppers and conspiracy theorists are keenly aware of the difficulty of creating alternative lifestyles outside of the mainstream societal, economic and political realms. In acknowledgment of this, the vision of apocalypse becomes a means to fantasize alternative possibilities while withholding in the present.
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5 Zombies and the People Who Are Them 2014 Spring Calandrino, Dania This paper examines a collective and continuous narrative arc throughout zombie movies, specifically the transforming site of control and...
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This paper examines a collective and continuous narrative arc throughout zombie movies, specifically the transforming site of control and possession. The decentralization of agency which is most notably presented in Gorge A. Romero's films beginning with Night of the Living Dead initiates an apocalyptic cycle of zombification in which 'control' is deconstructed. The zombie apocalypse presumes that every person will be transformed, thus humanity approaches absolute coherence and unanimity. The zombie, as the hypostatic human, is without subjectivity. As an entity which is both human and nonhuman, the zombie's interaction with the living is both violent and non-violent. A body which no longer suffers needs, desire, anger, or the will to inflict violence, or the memory of violence/conceptualization of self as victim in which violence is preserved. Since the zombie is incapable of moral judgment, it is the protagonists who choose how to preserve violence through institutional control. Rene Girard's book Violence and the Sacred is of key interest to this examination of violence in zombie movies. This paper contends that the zombie genre is of particular interest to mythology, as it offers us the opportunity to see how myths are generated from a lived, present example, and not compromised by both temporal and cultural distance which challenge anthropologic analyses of ancient or foreign myths. I will detail a contiguous evolution of the zombie from its origins in Haitian folklore, to its more recent manifestations as a cannibal or orally aggressive 'infected' body. The zombie reflects our understanding of the socially formative and destructive roles that violence plays in society and a global economy. Subjectivity presumes an interior experience of autonomy. Visible gore is discussed as a device which simulates in the viewer the experience of violation: alienation from the ego from the body. Institutionalized conceptions of contamination and purity are exploited by the presentation of the zombie and goring as the zombie's dialogic form. Julia Kristeva's book Powers of Horror is discussed in this context.
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6 Meatspace Bodies as Vessels 2016 Spring Pak, Sharon This thesis is only viewable on the SAIC campus.
7 We Can Do Better: Manets, Monets, Capris & Pillow Bags: Breaking Exhibition-Making // Destroying Didactics 2016 Spring Hughes, Taylor Hansen From the preface: "I remember when I first walked up to the Art Institute of Chicago's lion-gated entrance. I remember being in awe of...
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From the preface: "I remember when I first walked up to the Art Institute of Chicago's lion-gated entrance. I remember being in awe of the giant green lions and the grandiose staircase. I couldn't compare the building itself to anything else, except for maybe a strange combination of the Daddy Warbucks estate and the central branch of a public library. I must have been about five years old, and my biggest ambitions at the time were to look like an Olsen twin and to acquire a Barbie Dream House. What I did not anticipate is that I would fall in love there. My parents probably did not anticipate that I would beg them to go back- that I would ask them to have my birthday parties there, to show my friends how wonderful I thought it was. My mom still likes to tell the stories of me walking around there as a little girl, when not a lot could hold my attention but the work at the Art Institute could. She loves the anecdote about little four year old Tay pointing out the fragmented, inflamed Eiffel Tower in Robert Delaunay's Champs de Mars: The Red Tower. How bright her baby was; 'Look mommy, it's the Eiffel Tower!'"
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8 Issues of (ln)visibility: The Asian-American Presence in Mainstream and Independent Comics 2016 Spring Lugtu, Sheika Marlitz S. The visual codes ingrained through centuries of Asian representation in America's media history consist of various stereotypes- from the...
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The visual codes ingrained through centuries of Asian representation in America's media history consist of various stereotypes- from the bulbous head and, fu-manchu wearing "Yellow Terror," the ninja and samurai, the exotic Dragon Lady, the comical brainiac and many others. How do I draw myself as Asian, when I do not see myself in this way as an American? I begin with science-fiction writer Dr. William F. Wu's collection of mainstream comics issues showing Asian characters from 1942-1985, later becoming central to the exhibition Marvels & Monsters: Unmasking Asian Images in U.S. Comics, 1942-1986 curated by Jeff Yang. The collection of over 600 comic issues is a tangible record of racism and xenophobic propaganda. These are the stereotypes that have affected the daily life of hundreds of generations of Asian Americans. Comics reflect the culture they are cultivated in and these images helped shape how American society sees and represents Asian Americans. I then focus on three artists whose work in newspaper funnies, illustration and graphic novels become an entry point for me to examine how Asians and Asian Americans have represented themselves in relation and reaction to the dominant white American culture of their era. These are: The Four Immigrants Manga: A Japanese Experience in San Francisco, 1904-1924, a series of rejected newspaper strips that were self-published in 1931 by Japanese Immigrant Yoshitaka Kiyama. Citizen 13660, a series of documentary-style drawings and accompanying text by second generation American, or Nisei, writer and artist Mine Okubo while in the internment camps from 1942-1944. Last is contemporary graphic novel American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang, published in 2006 and now a required text in many American middle school school curriculum.
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9 In Defense of the Voice: Times and Spaces of Dissent in Heterogeneous Urban Territories 2016 Spring Alfonso, David Andres Ayala The current work explores performs an exploration on the act of political dissent in artistic and non-artistic forms, in relation to the...
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The current work explores performs an exploration on the act of political dissent in artistic and non-artistic forms, in relation to the urban spaces on which it takes place. It questions how the morphology and qualities of the space on which dissent takes place determine the possibilities as well as the form of the act itself. The study is performed on spaces and practices located in the city of Bogota, Colombia, as an example where the urban environment complicates the voicing of dissent by its complexity and heterogeneity. In order to built the argument, the text reflects on the emergence of the voice in the scream as a sign of dissent. It then transits into the elaboration of the smooth and the striated as spatial typologies for that facilitate or impede body flows and acts of dissent. Then it narrates the emergence of specific spaces in the city of Bogota that coincide with these typologies, in order to understand how the different spaces raise propose different challenges to the act of dissent, and concludes revising artistic and non-artistic examples of dissent rooted in these scenarios. The different chapters are developed with the support of case studies and visual examples from cinema, architecture, media and visual arts, which provide images and vignettes that place the reader in the visual realm of the argument.
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10 Black But Italian: Not Just Black, More Than Italian 2016 Spring Petrolito, Alessia From the author's introduction: For the duration of this thesis I am going to focus on adoption and international adoptees, addressing...
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From the author's introduction: For the duration of this thesis I am going to focus on adoption and international adoptees, addressing them as a "social category" Adoptees are among the less acknowledged and represented categories by the media and general public, international adoption in particular. To be precise. I am not referring to adopted children. but to those that were children yesterday: adult adoptees. My intent is to look at the adult adoptee as "cultural consumer" to reflect in general on the impact and effect that media and social media have on adoptee identity development. Specifically to the encounter and the imposition of cultural frames experienced by adoptees abroad and in Italy operated by the people of color and not: family, friends, colleagues, acquaintances, and passersby affected by what Yudice in The Expediency of Culture calls "imaginary of diversity projected by consumer culture."
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11 The Rise of GOP Political Outsiders in the 2016 Presidential Elections 2016 Spring Byer, Nicole This thesis examines the prominence of political outsiders in the 2016 presidential elections as well as the societal shift from looking...
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This thesis examines the prominence of political outsiders in the 2016 presidential elections as well as the societal shift from looking for outsiders with a military background to those with a business background and tries to look at what kind of presidents have historically been successful. There is a common misconception that political outsiders have only appeared in the most recent elections. However, due to bribery and scandals, people have historically often looked for presidents outside of the political sphere as in some ways superior. Political outsiders started becoming prominent candidates in 1992 with Ross Perot, and in recent decades the public has been looking for a candidate who is considered enough of an outsider to increase openness in the system, as well as believed to be well informed enough about the current political system to maintain its stability. To further understand the shift from looking for candidates with military experience to those with business experience, I examine the backgrounds of and try to understand the appeal behind political outsiders, Donald Trump and Ben Carson.
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12 Making a Living 2016 Spring Cabral, Edward This thesis is only viewable on the SAIC campus.
13 Bibliographic Performances and Surrogate Readings 2016 Spring Rebel, Janelle A bibliography is a performative place of changeable references, with the capacity to exhibit research and serve as a site for...
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A bibliography is a performative place of changeable references, with the capacity to exhibit research and serve as a site for interaction. Too little attention has been paid to the visual materiality, graphic textuality, and conceptual underpinnings of subject bibliographies, for instance the ways in which they represent resources, the ways in which they influence the reader-researcher, and the ways in which they deal and trade in surrogates. This thesis winds up the fields of textual studies, library science, and graphic design, with a healthy dose of voices from geography, art history, literature, architecture, and poetry.
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14 Anticipating Applause: (A)trophies, Events of Audition and Collected Accounts 2014 Spring Del Dago, Carolina Fernandez Applause is a distinctive, striking gesture. How humans came to apply it as practice and display is mostly unknown. Left only with the...
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Applause is a distinctive, striking gesture. How humans came to apply it as practice and display is mostly unknown. Left only with the knowledge that it is a very old custom, clapping has been a curiously and deeply embedded social convention. It has been both a negative and positive tool, used by audiences and groups of people for representing themselves in public life. This thesis approaches raucous permutations of applause at different times in history, not attempting to trace a chronology of the gesture, but rather in efforts to collect a variety of contexts in which it thrives. The resulting collection is meant to give depth to the modes and meanings of applause itself. Because applause is so ingrained in human culture, through my research I've found that it proved to be a substantial topic of investigation, and is a generous insight into how we organize socially and make decisions within, and throughout, collectivity.
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15 City of Future Delights: Dispatches from the Chinese Dream 2016 Spring Lee, Kevin B. City of Future Delights is a film and written document that explores urban landscapes of digital light as an expression of The Chinese...
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City of Future Delights is a film and written document that explores urban landscapes of digital light as an expression of The Chinese Dream. The Chinese Dream is ideological slogan currently promoted by the Chinese Communist Party. It suggests an unprecedented possibility for individual aspiration within a nation and culture that has long emphasized collective interests. I examine urban public light in China, specifically, digital billboards and LED light fixtures, as a theater that stages encounters between the aspirations of individuals and those of the Chinese state. Original documentary footage filmed in China will be infused with both critical reflections and a parafictional narrative of two filmmakers pursuing their dream to make a movie in China. This approach underscores the parafictional qualities latent in the Chinese Dream that infuse Chinese daily life with elements of fantasy, manifesting a dream state of aspiration among the Chinese populace. This inquiry concludes by considering new forms of seeing (both individual and collective) that may be brought about through living in the age of The Chinese Dream.
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16 Inhabiting Multiple Spaces, Voices and Times: Performance Translation and Subjectivity 2016 Spring Mohr, Nicole von The history between identity binaries and its categories is a long one; it is one that demarcates, white from black, colonizer from...
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The history between identity binaries and its categories is a long one; it is one that demarcates, white from black, colonizer from colonized, male from female, and the self from the other. In other words, the discourse between the western white "self" has historically depended on the historical fabrication of the non-western, non-white "other". This follows from the argument that there would be no self if there were no "other."
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17 Black Maple: Exploring the Diasporic Aesthetic of New Toronto Artists Yannick Anton, Taiwo Bah, and Nabi Shash 2015 Spring Mings, Felicia In looking at the photography projects of Yannick Anton, Taiwo Bah, and Nabil Shash, this paper attempts to highlight Black artistic...
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In looking at the photography projects of Yannick Anton, Taiwo Bah, and Nabil Shash, this paper attempts to highlight Black artistic practices emanating from Canada. To a large extent, these photographers' subject matter and context of production are a reflection of the position of Black people in Canada. These artists' images are fraught with the social and political experiences affecting young people living in Toronto. Their artwork speaks to the ways in which Black Torontonians from a range of ethno-cultural origins, sexual orientations, ages, and experiences perform their identities. Therefore, this study uses "diaspora" as a framework for socio-historical and artistic analysis. Diaspora enables a socio-historical reading of negated Black identities and experiences in Canada via the subjects of Anton's, Bah's and Shash's images. Additionally, the diasporic method challenges the category of contemporary art by focusing on these photographers' vernacular aesthetic.
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18 Outward Translations: An Exploration of Externalized Imagery 2014 Spring Engel, Miriam Zora This essay addresses questions of the relationship between images and memory, and the way in which these different modes of imagery...
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This essay addresses questions of the relationship between images and memory, and the way in which these different modes of imagery relate to truth. After beginning with a personal anecdote describing an early memory from childhood, I will introduce three types of images. These are internal mind images, photographs, and created externalized imagery. Although I separate images here in order to talk about them in a dynamic fashion, these image "types" are very much related. I will spend one section discussing the complex relationships between these categories, exploring how they interact with and inform one another. My focus here, though, is an exploration of the third type of image, the externalized one. I will investigate different examples of externalized imagery including paintings from memory, dream journals, and Carl Jung's visual manuscript, The Red Book. After analyzing these case studies in depth, I discuss a new development in neuroscience technology: Yukiyasu Kamitani's current research project, an attempt to use computers to decode dream content in the form of legible images. This type of dream-reading, image-making technology would create an entirely new modality that allows for externalizing the internal image. I will explore the reasons why this technological novelty is so deeply fascinating and attractive to the public eye. Kamitani's dream-reader may be viewed as having more scientific, accurate depictions of internal imagery than can be achieved through other mediums. However, I will argue that while Kamitani's machinery would allow for a new modality of representation, it would not hold any more "truth" or validity than would a painting or a journal entry.
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19 Little Boys Wielding Swords [Ken o furimawasu chisana otokonoko] 2014 Spring Jonassen, Anna Gene [Tokōsha An'na Jin Yohanson] I introduce my personal narrative in relation to unique power structures illustrated in select Japanese written and visual Neo Pop and...
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I introduce my personal narrative in relation to unique power structures illustrated in select Japanese written and visual Neo Pop and Superflat art. The contemporary work includes images and written essays from the exhibition catalog of the 2005 show 'Little Boy: The Arts of Japan's Exploding Subculture' curated by Takashi Murakami. I investigate Murakami's claim that Japan is infantile as a result of the loss and devastation of WWII. I am interested in exploring the roots of this claim, and considering whether there is a lineage of artwork in Japan that illustrates trauma in a similar way, tracing back to work from the Edo Period (1603-1867) of Japan, leading up to a genre of art and literature called ‘ero guro nansensu’ from the 1920s-30s. In addition, I briefly explore current events in Japan that potentially refute his assertions. Ultimately, my aim in this investigation is not to discount Murakami's statements, but rather to account for complexities that have not been included in the conversation.
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20 Art beyond anthropocentrism : Part I. Artifacts on the loose : Part II. Models for an object-oriented worldview 2014 Spring Anderson, Kayla Framed by materialist, poststructuralist, and cyborg theory, along with more recent work in object-oriented philosophy, this thesis...
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Framed by materialist, poststructuralist, and cyborg theory, along with more recent work in object-oriented philosophy, this thesis posits alternative, anti-hierarchical configurations of human subjects and non-human objects. I interpret works by media and technology-based artists Shana Moulton, Paula Gaetano Adi, Dunne & Raby, AugerLoizeau, and Lindsey French as models for thinking in an object-oriented mindset. In order to do so, I will expose how these works implicate either the artist or viewer as one object among many and deny a single perceptive-subject or protagonist. I will include in my analysis recent exhibitions that have focused on object-oriented ontology and related philosophies as a theme, such as Animism (2010) at M HKA, Antwerp, Talk To Me (2011) at MoMA, New York, and Field Static (2012) at Co-Prosperity Sphere, Chicago, as instances where art is used as a test-site for envisioning these ideologies. In the age of the Anthropocene, as we begin to recognize the extreme effects that human activity has had on the Earth's ecosystems, reflection on the relationship between humans and other objects becomes increasingly urgent in terms of ethics and ecology. I see the potential reconfigurations posed by these works as imperfect but impactful steps towards configuring a less anthropocentric worldview; one in which humans assume a less hierarchical view of their ontological status among other entities, and as a result become more cognizant of their effects on the world as a web of relations which they both affect and are affected by. As a complement to this investigation, the foreword to this thesis provides a scenario of shifting boundary lines between humans and other objects in the form of theory-rooted speculative fiction. At the dawn of 2013, a group of 22 objects escape from the holdings of a prestigious art institution. What results is a discussion around the formulation of new terminology to consider objects and subjects, the formulation of new modes of communication between people and other things, and steps towards a more object-oriented world.
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