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# Title Semester Author Description Access Restrictions
1 A Materials Exploration: What Can Be Used to Make Art? 2016 Spring Hager, Mary Ogden This thesis project explores the development of art therapy directives using found objects and recycled materials with the intent of...
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This thesis project explores the development of art therapy directives using found objects and recycled materials with the intent of broadening children's perspectives about what they believe can be used to make art. A review of relevant literature regarding the use of found objects by artists and art therapists concludes that material selection in art therapy can have a lasting impact on a client's therapeutic experience (Moon, 2010). For the purpose of this study I have focused on three practical considerations of materials: accessibility, affordability, and the client's age/developmental level. Art directives for this thesis were developed during an after school art therapy group structured around creative art making using found objects, recycled materials, and traditional art supplies. The 60-minute group met once a week for seven weeks, and was comprised of six students ranging from six to eight years old. A pre- and post-materials assessment was developed and implemented to evaluate what the group members identified as materials they could use to make art. When comparing scores this assessment revealed an increase in the number of materials each member believed they could use to make art. There was a direct relationship between materials the group believed they could use and materials that were used for the weekly art directives. This relationship points to the importance of exposure. This research project revealed the value in exposing young children to new materials and art processes; the opportunities and challenges of art therapy in an after-school setting; and adapting to the dual-role of clinician and researcher. The group allowed the children to tap into their creativity by discovering new found potential in an expanding range of materials. When the idea that "anything can be used to make art" is embodied, the access one has to materials can be endless.
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2 African American Men in Art Therapy: Exploring and Expanding the Diversity in the Profession 2016 Spring White-Peck, Dehvin R. Expanding diversity in the field of art therapy to include Black men has been a vision of mine since my interview day at the School of...
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Expanding diversity in the field of art therapy to include Black men has been a vision of mine since my interview day at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. From my experience of attending a Historically Black College, I have an understanding of the benefits that establishing art therapy programs at these institutions could have, not only for art therapy but for HBCUs. There are 103 HBCUs in existence, and not one has an established art therapy program. A 2013 demographic survey of art therapists by the American Art Therapy Association showed overwhelmingly disproportionate demographics, with 93.4% being female, and 87.9% White. This means that there is a demographically disproportionate ratio between therapists and the clients they serve. I questioned if this was healthy for the therapeutic environment, and saw a need for change and action. Informed by research by Awais and Yali (2015), who surveyed the efforts that have been made to increase diversity in art therapy programs, I decided to interview HBCUs about their receptiveness to art therapy education, and also to interview schools with existing art therapy programs. In interviews with Florida State University, Pratt Institute, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Albany State University, and Bowie State University, I explored what could be done to introduce art therapy education at these institutions. Another component of my research was gathering the stories of Black male art therapists, learning how they were drawn to the field, and their inspiration for the work they do. I conclude that intensive outreach to HBCUs is necessary, to raise awareness of art therapy as a profession, to create a demand for art therapy education at those institutions, and ultimately to increase ethnic and gender diversity by drawing Black men into the field. Keywords: diversity, black, males, therapist, HBCU, art therapy
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3 Online-sourced video collage in therapy with Asian immigrants experiencing acculturation difficulties: A literature review and proposal 2016 Spring Yu, Dustin Ryan Research suggests many forms of acculturation stress and difficulties experienced by Asian immigrants, including language barriers,...
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Research suggests many forms of acculturation stress and difficulties experienced by Asian immigrants, including language barriers, susceptibility to mental illness, academic and occupational pressures, and shifts in sense of identity. Using a literature review and a sample grant proposal, this thesis explores the potential therapeutic benefits of art therapy with this population. More specifically, a proposed intervention intends to provide therapeutic benefits based on converging interdisciplinary research and this author's personal art-making process. This intervention incorporates an online-sourced video collage (OSVC) method to help reduce any acculturative difficulties Asian immigrants may be experiencing. Currently, there is limited to no research relating to the components of collaging appropriated video as an intervention. The intervention proposes a 6-to-10-week program that helps participants learn video-making skills, process ideas with an art therapist, and potentially develop their sense of identity. Connections between acculturation difficulties and potential benefits of using this intervention are explored throughout. This research ultimately looks towards the future, and attempts to fulfill a niche in the art therapy field that demands attention. Keywords: Asian, immigrants, acculturation, art therapy, video, collage, technology, digital media, appropriation, research, culture.
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4 Documenting Ritual: An Autoethnographic Study of Cross-Cultural Work in Art Therapy 2015 Spring Krause, Julie B. This thesis examines photographic documentation as a way to explore and understand healing rituals in cross-cultural work. As art...
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This thesis examines photographic documentation as a way to explore and understand healing rituals in cross-cultural work. As art therapists, we increasingly work with a wide range of diverse populations and there is an ongoing need for cultural competency in regards to therapeutic practice. Learning about the traditional rituals and healing practices of cultures outside of our own can not only help to broaden our competency but also inform the work we do. Understanding the origins and intention behind these practices, as well as the context in which they are applied can benefit the way we practice and influence the various approaches necessary to meet our clients' needs. This thesis serves as a first step toward understanding how traditional nonwestern healing rituals can inform our work as art therapists. It offers a review of crosscultural work in art therapy and an analysis of photography as a tool and method for art therapists doing this type of work. More importantly, it highlights the significance and implications of working cross-culturally and the need for research and groundwork, before entering into the communities and personal lives of those living in other cultures. Included in this thesis is an autoethnographic study employing photography as a method to document, analyze and understand the process of fabric dying as an alternative healing ritual. As a result of this self-study, the concept of what it means to be an outsider/viewer/documenter/collaborator and how to approach cross-cultural work with sensitivity using an art therapists' lens is discussed.
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5 The Art of Hearing: Response Art as Part of the Active Listening Process 2016 Spring Clarke, Catherine When invisible disabilities such as sensory loss, chronic illness, or mental illness result in marginalization, individuals are often...
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When invisible disabilities such as sensory loss, chronic illness, or mental illness result in marginalization, individuals are often left feeling silenced or unheard. As a hearing-impaired art therapist working within a culture that relies heavily on the auditory sense for communication, I ask, what does it really mean to "hear"? This heuristic art-based research study examines the use of visual response art as a means to enhance communication, increase understanding, promote accurate empathy, and allow previously unheard or silenced clients to feel heard. Within the field of art therapy, response art is defined as "art that is made by the art therapist in response to clinical work, which is used to express, contain, and explore that work" (Fish, 2006). I respond to the stories of two very different elderly clients in a senior living community, who are among a population often rendered invisible and thus marginalized within a Western culture that values youth, autonomy, and a healthy body. My art-based method is informed by the constructivist tenets and processes of narrative therapy (McMahon, 2006), image-based narrative inquiry (Fish, 2006), and Jung's active imagination (Chodorow, 1997). Over the course of fourteen sessions rich, tangible benefits to both clients and the art therapist were gained. Rather than limiting the active listening process solely to the auditory sense, research results suggest that a multi-sensory approach that includes the use of response art can enhance communication, understanding, and accurate empathy in the therapeutic relationship.
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6 Art Therapy and Memory: A Case Study Utilizing Ceramic Wheel Throwing in Brain Injury Rehabilitation 2015 Spring Thompson, Teresa This study examines the use of ceramic wheel throwing as an art therapy intervention to increase memory with an individual who...
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This study examines the use of ceramic wheel throwing as an art therapy intervention to increase memory with an individual who experiences significant memory impairments as a result of a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Wheel throwing was chosen because of the potential for multiple sensory systems to be activated, creating the possibility for various types of memory to be developed. It is a sequential, step-based process that allows for standardized assessment of retention. The study consisted of a pre- and post-assessment, using the Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test (CLQT), and ten individual art therapy sessions focusing on wheel throwing. A standardized method assessing recall was used to document step retention during the sessions. Additional observations were made each week by the primary researcher, which served as qualitative results during data analysis at the end of the ten sessions. Results from this study indicate that the participant demonstrated learning of the wheel throwing process. Quantitative and qualitative data suggest that the participant was able to recall steps that require more physical effort and direct manipulation of the clay. Results also suggest greater recall when encouraged to use nonverbal communication to complete the steps, which could support differences in verbal and visual or haptic memory. Implications of this possibility are discussed in the context of developing art therapy interventions for individuals who experience memory impairments as a result of brain injury.
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7 We Are Not Always Broken: Using Poetry and Mosaic Making as a Tools for Survivors of Sexual Assault and Sexual Abuse 2015 Spring Johnson, Marline S. The purpose of this thesis project is to explore the unique relationship between writing poetry and creating mosaics when working with...
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The purpose of this thesis project is to explore the unique relationship between writing poetry and creating mosaics when working with survivors of sexual abuse and sexual assault. This auto-ethnographic art-based exploration examines how I use these media to process trauma and emphasizes the necessity of each art form -- poems as psychological vessels and mosaics as physical vessels -- as means to holistically contain my intersecting identities of artist, art therapist, and survivor.
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8 Linguistic and Emotional Receptive Skill Art Therapy Assessment (LERSATA) for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children 2015 Spring King, Noel E. This pilot study examined the development of an art therapy-based assessment for deaf and hard of hearing children (d/hh) aged 10 to 14....
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This pilot study examined the development of an art therapy-based assessment for deaf and hard of hearing children (d/hh) aged 10 to 14. Although linguistics among d/hh children has been extensively studied during the past 10 years, little research exists regarding the efficacy of early development interventions related to emotional and cognitive developments in deaf children's primary language, American Sign Language (ASL). This research includes Deaf culture, linguistic perspectives, and an overview of the Linguistic and Emotional Receptive Skill Art Therapy Assessment (LERSATA), an early intervention art therapy assessment designed to detect emotional and cognitive developments in d/hh children. This study evaluated the efficacy of the LERSATA in measuring the participants' emotional receptive skills in ASL for four weeks during the art therapy sessions, which saw two stories in ASL and spoken English. An analysis of the data does not indicate that the assessment detects specific emotional and cognitive developments in d/hh children. However, results support that d/hh children receiving the art therapy intervention showed better receptive skill responses in ASL, and were able to understand the nature of visual through ASL stories in the LERSATA.
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9 Unwinding the Threads: A Social Constructivist Examination of Fibers as a Natural Material 2015 Spring Boyle, Megan M. This thesis served as an autoethnographic material study investigating the properties of fibers as a natural material through the lens of...
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This thesis served as an autoethnographic material study investigating the properties of fibers as a natural material through the lens of the social constructivist theory of materiality. Social constructivism views materials as artifacts of each individual's socio-cultural experience. By deconstructing fibers using Moon's (2010) 7 factors, including aesthetic preference, physical and sensual character, personal associations, associated language, utilitarian function, pop culture, and historical relevance, I examined my personal interaction with the material in an attempt to be aware of my own biases and relationship with fibers in order to be more thoughtful of my use of the material in my art therapy practice. Data was collected through the creation of a Textile Artist Book, completion of pre and post assessment questionnaires, and a collection of written observation notes. I worked with fibers including wool, cotton thread, natural dye, and muslin fabric; utilizing a range of techniques including weaving, felting, embroidery, and sewing. By working with the material hands on, I considered the constructed identity of fibers within the realm of my personal experiences and my feminine self. This research looks specifically at working with fibers, but can be applied to other art materials in order to be more socially aware and thoughtful art therapists.
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10 The Memory Jars: A Journey Through Memory Loss 2015 Summer Garb, Leslie Albie This art based research project explores the use of storytelling through a children's book with the intent to engage older adults...
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This art based research project explores the use of storytelling through a children's book with the intent to engage older adults experiencing memory loss and their grandchildren. Through working as an art therapy intern at Advocate Lutheran General's (ALG) Older Adult Services and Expressions Program I was given the opportunity to learn about issues surrounding memory loss and stigmatization that surrounds the disease focused model. My research and literature review focuses on the person-centered theory, which examines the person experiencing the disease at the forefront, highlighting ones abilities rather than inabilities. By examining the strengths that one exhibits rather than focusing on the abilities that are lost allowed for the creation of a strength-based children's book addressing memory loss to emerge. I carefully examined the impact of children's literature and the literature that is currently available for children regarding memory loss and aging. This project illustrates the stories I have witnessed that depict the unique lived experiences of members at Advocate Lutheran General providing a visually engaging explorative language that expresses the validity and importance of how stories contribute to our everyday existence. It invites caretakers and family members to see the person living with memory loss through an artistic lens that encourages curiosity and wonder to be explored within each individual. Common themes such as: identity, community, hopes and dreams were explored and woven together in the final format of, The Memory Jars. The art based research method allowed for continuous participant feedback throughout the duration of the project, and ultimately became a book that was dispersed amongst participants and their family members.
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11 The Supervisory Relationship: Exploring the use of Video as an Adjunctive Tool in Art Therapy Supervision 2015 Spring Lee, Sze-Chin This art-based heuristic inquiry examined the use of video as an adjunctive tool for art-based supervision, and focused on art that I...
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This art-based heuristic inquiry examined the use of video as an adjunctive tool for art-based supervision, and focused on art that I made in response to my work with patients at a children's hospital. The use of video as a means of exploring aspects of my artist identity was key to the development of my interest in studying the use of video to enhance art therapy supervision, and to examine my art therapist identity. The study consisted of three parts. The first part was comprised of ten sessions of video recordings, in which I employed two or three video cameras to document the responses to my experiences at the hospital. This format of the video journal enabled me to record my verbal reflections, as well as the physical process of response art making. For the second part of the study, significant sections of the videos were reviewed during supervision sessions. Finally, I documented my written observations and reflections of the process of making the video journals, as well as feedback from my supervisor. The video journals offered a 2-tiered approach to communicate my responses. They allowed my supervisor to immerse in my subjective experience of response art making, and to examine the objective experience of reviewing the video journals. Together, the findings suggest that video is a useful means to journal one's art responses, and helps to enrich the supervisory relationship. Keywords: heuristic, art-based, video, video journal, art therapy supervision, response art, reflection, document, archive, record, tool for processing experiences
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12 Clearing the Space: A Trauma-Informed Perspective on the Art Therapy Studio 2015 Spring Bosch-Duffy, Lillian This study is focused on the spatial arrangement of an art therapy studio space located in a residential facility for children. The...
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This study is focused on the spatial arrangement of an art therapy studio space located in a residential facility for children. The project was focused on cleaning out a cluttered art therapy studio, followed by re-organizing and re-arranging the space to create a more comfortable and trauma informed environment. The intention for the transformation of the space was to positively support trauma treatment in a stable setting to enhance the feeling of safety. This was a two part investigation; the first part consisted of researching the factors that contribute to the visual environment, such as color, light, furnishings, and spatial arrangement. Extensive research was conducted into a variety of fields, including visual settings and stimulation; learning environments; ADHD; and institutional spaces. Additional investigation into the impact of the physical environment on individuals who have experienced developmental trauma, and its influences on behaviors of impulsivity, hypervigilance and hyperarousal, was included in this research. The second part of the project involved re-arranging the interior space of the art therapy studio from a trauma-informed perspective. Personal observations and notes were taken to compare individuals' behaviors and reactions to the art therapy studio before and after it had been re-configured. Results of this study suggest that an informed spatial intervention, with sensitivity to the behavioral manifestations of trauma, can lower the amount of impulsivity and increase the sense of safety and security in the space. Keywords: Art therapy, studio, residential, children, trauma, space, spatial, arrangement, reconfiguration, interior, hyperaroursal, hypervigilance, impulsivity, behavior, institutional, ADHD, learning, environments, visual, settings, stimulation, color, light, furniture, safety, comfort, cleaning, cluttered, re-organizing, organizing, developmental, transformation, positive, transformation
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13 Expression and Containment: Using IEP Goals to Inform Art Therapy Treatment Plans 2015 Spring Rynn, Amy E. This thesis developed as a single case study within a therapeutic day school, where I developed an art therapy program for students with...
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This thesis developed as a single case study within a therapeutic day school, where I developed an art therapy program for students with emotional and behavioral disabilities. The intention for this study was to determine if art therapy would be a viable objective for students' Individualized Education Plan goals. Using the research on art therapy in schools, I created an art therapy program that fit into the structure of this therapeutic day school. I used the students' IEPs to create art therapy goals that aligned with the social and emotional goals developed by their teachers and social workers. I worked with a team of therapeutic staff to determine the qualitative data revealed through students' visual art work, as well as in the interpersonal relationships that developed through individual art therapy sessions. The student in this case study is a 7 year old boy diagnosed with intermittent explosive disorder and AD/HD-impulsive type. The diagnosis of an emotional and behavioral disability, along with the social/emotional goals in his IEP, determined his participation in this study. His school teachers and staff had been using a behavioral approach in working toward his goals. I melded the school's behavioral approach with my own humanistic approach. During the course of this case study, I further defined my own conceptual framework for art therapy, which includes a strong tendency to be child-centered, and often included aspects of play that incorporated characters created by the student. Having a child-centered approach also led to a trust-filled therapeutic relationship where the student could work to understand his emotions. As the art therapist, I encouraged the student to differentiate his behaviors from his emotions, validating his emotions, while directing his energy into healthy play. Keywords: Emotional disability, Behavioral disability, intermittent explosive disorder, AD/HD, Therapeutic Day School, Art therapy in Schools, Individualized Education Plan, Humanistic Art Therapy, Behavioral Art Therapy, play therapy, program development
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14 Animating Empathy: An Art Based Inquiry On Empathic Accuracy 2015 Spring Gans, Jason Blaise This art-based research study investigates my art practice of making response art in the form of hand-drawn animations, as a means to...
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This art-based research study investigates my art practice of making response art in the form of hand-drawn animations, as a means to enter the private world of the client. I review relevant literature on the therapeutic techniques of Carl Rogers, including empathy, congruence, and unconditional positive regard. I find parallels in the therapeutic language of person-centered therapy and the methods used to train animators. As an art therapy intern Heartland Health Outreach, an organization that provides housing and services needs of endangered populations, I worked with a diverse population of adults who are dually diagnosed with serious mental illness, and who struggle with substance abuse. My method consisted of using non-directive person-centered therapy and making a weekly animation in response to an interaction with a participant. The interaction represents an opportunity for personal growth and to develop empathic accuracy. The discussion focuses on how making these animations changed my relationships with participants. I conclude that the process of animation was useful to deconstruct the experiences and test my empathic accuracy while building a therapeutic alliance.
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15 Arto-Ethnography: A Critically Conscious Intersectional Analysis on Race, Class, and Gender for Art Therapists 2015 Spring DeGraw, Rebecca This study seeks to develop an interpersonal practice of critical consciousness while practicing art therapy with clients. Critical...
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This study seeks to develop an interpersonal practice of critical consciousness while practicing art therapy with clients. Critical consciousness encourages art therapists to evolve a deep understanding of socially constructed identities formed within systemic privileges and oppressions, aiding in creating an authentic therapeutic space between client and therapist. Critically conscious art therapists consistently challenge themselves to understand their influence on clients in a therapeutic relationship, as it relates to their intersections of race, class, and gender. Using an auto-ethnographic and art-based intersectional analysis, this research will demonstrate the complex process of developing critical consciousness. To do so, the researcher interviewed two participants from different backgrounds to understand the social construction of race, class, and gender of the research participants. The process follows a blossoming understanding of the researcher's critical consciousness and develops her awareness on intersections of race, class, and gender.
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16 Story Quilting: Developing Empathy in Art Therapy with Adolescent Girls 2014 Spring Riddle, Kelly Elisabeth This art-based thesis employed both quantitative and qualitative methods to explore the use of collaborative art making to promote a...
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This art-based thesis employed both quantitative and qualitative methods to explore the use of collaborative art making to promote a strong sense of peer connectedness, and to cultivate empathic understanding in elementary school girls. In this study, five fifth-grade girls created a collaborative story quilt during an art therapy group at an elementary charter school serving the North Kenwood I Oakland, and surrounding neighborhoods of Chicago. The group convened once a week for seven weeks to work on the quilt, and during each session the participants engaged in conversation, shared stories, and exchanged creative ideas. The participants' behaviors were documented through written observations and art-based responses, and the group's overall display of empathy was scored on a Likert scale, using an assessment that was designed specifically to track the group's empathic growth during the seven-week intervention. This study-which includes a review of literature relevant to empathy development and collaborative art making-supports the need for creative, collaborative opportunities in school settings, and illustrates the benefits of art making as a way to foster empathic growth and peer connectedness among adolescent girls.
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17 Developmental Art Therapy with the Deaf-Blind Population: A Study of Haptic Perception and Art Materials 2014 Spring Kohler, Ryan This study looks at the association between haptic development and art materials in an attempt to expand on the practice of developmental...
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This study looks at the association between haptic development and art materials in an attempt to expand on the practice of developmental art therapy with persons who are deaf-blind. Haptic development, the development of touch, involves both motor and cognitive considerations, and is measurable through observable motor movements called exploratory procedures (EPs). For the purpose of determining the association between haptic development and art materials with persons who are deaf-blind, this study performed 12 trials of 4 discrimination and categorization tasks for each art material with a single deaf-blind participant. EPs were recorded per trial for each material and measured for statistical significance per EP. The four art materials include paper, muslin fabric, chalk pastel, and wet air-dry clay. Statistically significant variance of art materials per EP were found for three of the eight EPs. Materials that varied significantly were identified using a post-hoc test. The results show that there is an association between art materials and EPs. This association is discussed in the context of haptic development and developmental art therapy, and conclusions are made about ways of developing purposeful interventions while working with persons who are deaf-blind.
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18 Redacted/Reenacted: An Art-Based Inquiry on the Experience of Childhood Sexual Abuse 2015 Fall Lanctot, Daniel The author utilizes art-based inquiry to explore the subject of childhood sexual abuse and trauma, incorporating arts practices such as...
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The author utilizes art-based inquiry to explore the subject of childhood sexual abuse and trauma, incorporating arts practices such as altered bookmaking, poetry, music, performance, and video. Particular emphasis is given to the function of memory or the lack thereof in relation to trauma. The author explores how artwork can honor a past traumatic experience that has shattered one's sense of meaning, while considering the constructive and destructive qualities of re-visiting these painful memories through creative process. The author explores implications for practices in art therapy and conceptualizes "recovery" as a process of opening, closing and re-opening access to the body and mind in processing past trauma.
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19 A Mindfulness Preparation Technique for Art Therapists to Gain Greater Therapeutic Presence 2016 Spring Hubbard, Maia R. This thesis explored mindfulness as a way for art therapists to increase therapeutic presence when working with clients. Zen Buddhist...
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This thesis explored mindfulness as a way for art therapists to increase therapeutic presence when working with clients. Zen Buddhist practice was used as a foundation to explore mindfulness, and principles of both mindfulness practice and art therapy practice were drawn upon to create a technique that can be used in preparation for client sessions. The mindfulness technique that was created in this study combined meditation, journaling and art making, and was implemented over the course of five weeks to determine its' effectiveness in increasing therapeutic presence. Results include an examination of the mindfulness technique and how it impacted presence when working with clients. Also included is the use of the Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale to determine states of mindfulness prior to and immediately following client sessions. The application of the mindfulness technique and the importance of therapeutic presence are discussed.
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20 Criticality is like a Mirror: Locating Fine Arts Discourse in Art Therapy 2015 Summer Lin, Stephanie This thesis opens with a letter to the graduate dean of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, thanking her for the use of a studio...
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This thesis opens with a letter to the graduate dean of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, thanking her for the use of a studio space-a rare allotment for an art therapy student, explaining how this environment generated inquiry regarding art therapy's estranged relationship with the fine arts world. Responding to tension observed between art therapists and artists, I sought to locate points of contact between the two fields, and explore how engagement with art history and contemporary art discourse might impact an art therapist's skills and sensibilities. This was done through interviews and thematic analysis. Chain-referral and a preliminary questionnaire were used to screen for participants who practiced art therapy and were critically engaged with art history and contemporary art discourse. From an initial pool of fifteen, five art therapists were selected for in-depth interviews regarding the influence of fine arts discourse on their practice. Our conversations yielded the following areas of influence: philosophical framework, theoretical orientation, materials, and application. I conclude that fine arts discourse produces specific criticality that is essential to the growth of the field of art therapy, and calls for the prioritization of fine arts discourse in art therapy education as a step towards realigning our field professionally. My thesis closes with a letter to the president of the American Art Therapy Association, advocating for the addition of, at bare minimum, an art history survey course and a course in art after Modernism, to the prerequisite requirements of art therapy education.
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