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# Title Accession # Date Description Physical Location
1 Monologue/Dialogue, June 25-July 23, 1988 (Pre-Press) rsga_pst_00074pp June 15-July 23, 1988
2 Monologue/Dialogue, June 25-July 23, 1988 (Pre-Press) rsga_pst_00073pp June 15-July 23, 1988
3 Monologue/Dialogue, June 25-July 23, 1988 (Pre-Press) rsga_pst_00072pp June 15-July 23, 1988
4 Monologue/Dialogue, June 25-July 23, 1988 rsga_eph_00116 June 25-July 23, 1988 RSGA Ephemera: Drawer 1, 1979-1989
5 The San Francisco Eagle: A Gay Bar in Time of Change rsga-ph-01944 1986-1988 Reproduction of a photo from Doug Ischar's series "The San Francisco Eagle: A Gay Bar in Time of Change," 1986-1988, color photographs...
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Reproduction of a photo from Doug Ischar's series "The San Francisco Eagle: A Gay Bar in Time of Change," 1986-1988, color photographs with text. Ischar was one of four artists in the exhibition "Monologue/Dialogue," at Randolph Street Gallery, June 25-July 23, 1988, organized by Lynne Brown.</br> "The forms of representation of both images and texts in patriarchal, heterosexual culture are primarily a form of monologue, which establishes the dominant fictions of the society. Those who cannot participate in this monologue - including women, gays, and ethnic or racial minorities - often find themselves disenfranchised by their 'otherness.' The four gay artists whose photographs appear in this exhibition are all involved in finding subtle, distinct ways of subverting the patriarchal monologue and opening up possibilities of dialogue between the mainstream culture and those who are isolated by their 'difference.' Each of them combines text and image in a distinct way as part of that process. [...]</br> DOUG ISCHAR'S photographs document 'The San Francisco Eagle, a gay bar in time of change,' but they subvert the voyeuristic, sensationalist approach of most "documentary" photographs of gay lifestyle. Ischar's goal is to provide historical information in a social history where lack of record is the rule. Taken between June, 1986 and March, 1987, these photographs indicate, among other things, the impact of the AIDS crisis on gay public spaces." --[Source: Event calendar -- June/July 1988]
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Box 109
6 Monologue/Dialogue, June 25-July 23, 1988 rsga_pst_00073 June 25-July 23, 1988 RSGA Ephemera: Drawer 1, 1979-1989
7 [Title unknown] rsga-ph-01947 June 25-July 23, 1988 Reproduction of an unidentified photograph, by Kaucyila Brooke. Brooke was one of four artists in the exhibition "Monologue/Dialogue" at...
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Reproduction of an unidentified photograph, by Kaucyila Brooke. Brooke was one of four artists in the exhibition "Monologue/Dialogue" at Randolph Street Gallery, June 25-July 23, 1988, organized by Lynne Brown.</br> "The forms of representation of both images and texts in patriarchal, heterosexual culture are primarily a form of monologue, which establishes the dominant fictions of the society. Those who cannot participate in this monologue - including women, gays, and ethnic or racial minorities - often find themselves disenfranchised by their 'otherness.' The four gay artists whose photographs appear in this exhibition are all involved in finding subtle, distinct ways of subverting the patriarchal monologue and opening up possibilities of dialogue between the mainstream culture and those who are isolated by their 'difference.' Each of them combines text and image in a distinct way as part of that process. [...]</br> KAUCYILA BROOKE'S photographs are like cartoons, in which two women are shown in conversation, while exploring a Southwestern landscape. The artist notes, however, that the word balloons are the subject, and not just a means of advancing narrative. The work not only questions gender associations with place (as we see women in a landscape traditionally associated with men) but stereotypical representations of lesbians. As a result, the women in Brooke's photos do not appear 'exotic,' but 'just like other people.'" --[Source: Event calendar -- June/July 1988]
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Box 109
8 The San Francisco Eagle: A Gay Bar in Time of Change rsga-ph-01945 1986-1988 Reproduction of a photo from Doug Ischar's series "The San Francisco Eagle: A Gay Bar in Time of Change," 1986-1988, color photographs...
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Reproduction of a photo from Doug Ischar's series "The San Francisco Eagle: A Gay Bar in Time of Change," 1986-1988, color photographs with text. Ischar was one of four artists in the exhibition "Monologue/Dialogue," at Randolph Street Gallery, June 25-July 23, 1988, organized by Lynne Brown.</br> "The forms of representation of both images and texts in patriarchal, heterosexual culture are primarily a form of monologue, which establishes the dominant fictions of the society. Those who cannot participate in this monologue - including women, gays, and ethnic or racial minorities - often find themselves disenfranchised by their 'otherness.' The four gay artists whose photographs appear in this exhibition are all involved in finding subtle, distinct ways of subverting the patriarchal monologue and opening up possibilities of dialogue between the mainstream culture and those who are isolated by their 'difference.' Each of them combines text and image in a distinct way as part of that process. [...]</br> DOUG ISCHAR'S photographs document 'The San Francisco Eagle, a gay bar in time of change,' but they subvert the voyeuristic, sensationalist approach of most "documentary" photographs of gay lifestyle. Ischar's goal is to provide historical information in a social history where lack of record is the rule. Taken between June, 1986 and March, 1987, these photographs indicate, among other things, the impact of the AIDS crisis on gay public spaces." --[Source: Event calendar -- June/July 1988]
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Box 109
9 Autoviews rsga-ph-01949 1988 Photograph of Janet Pritchard's "Autoviews," 1988, color photograph, with text. Pritchard was one of four artists in the exhibition ...
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Photograph of Janet Pritchard's "Autoviews," 1988, color photograph, with text. Pritchard was one of four artists in the exhibition "Monologue/Dialogue" at Randolph Street Gallery, June 25-July 23, 1988, organized by Lynne Brown. </br>"The forms of representation of both images and texts in patriarchal, heterosexual culture are primarily a form of monologue, which establishes the dominant fictions of the society. Those who cannot participate in this monologue - including women, gays, and ethnic or racial minorities - often find themselves disenfranchised by their otherness."The four gay artists whose photographs appear in this exhibition are all involved in finding subtle, distinct ways of subverting the patriarchal monologue and opening up possibilities of dialogue between the mainstream culture and those who are isolated by their "difference." Each of them combines text and image in a distinct way as part of that process. [...]</br> 'Autoviews' by JANET PRITCHARD effectively uses t
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Box 109
10 Autoviews rsga-ph-01948 1988 Photograph of Janet Pritchard's "Autoviews," 1988, color photograph, with text. Pritchard was one of four artists in the exhibition ...
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Photograph of Janet Pritchard's "Autoviews," 1988, color photograph, with text. Pritchard was one of four artists in the exhibition "Monologue/Dialogue" at Randolph Street Gallery, June 25-July 23, 1988, organized by Lynne Brown. </br>"The forms of representation of both images and texts in patriarchal, heterosexual culture are primarily a form of monologue, which establishes the dominant fictions of the society. Those who cannot participate in this monologue - including women, gays, and ethnic or racial minorities - often find themselves disenfranchised by their otherness."The four gay artists whose photographs appear in this exhibition are all involved in finding subtle, distinct ways of subverting the patriarchal monologue and opening up possibilities of dialogue between the mainstream culture and those who are isolated by their "difference." Each of them combines text and image in a distinct way as part of that process. [...]</br> 'Autoviews' by JANET PRITCHARD effectively uses t
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Box 109
11 "Pretended" Family Relationships: Untitled 8 rsga-ph-01946 1988 Reproduction of Sunil Gupta's "'Pretended' Family Relationships: Untitled 8," 1988, C-type print, text on paper, and silver print, 91...
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Reproduction of Sunil Gupta's "'Pretended' Family Relationships: Untitled 8," 1988, C-type print, text on paper, and silver print, 91.4x61 cm.Gupta was one of four artists in the exhibition "Monologue/Dialogue" at Randolph Street Gallery, June 25-July 23, 1988, organized by Lynne Brown.; "The forms of representation of both images and texts in patriarchal, heterosexual culture are primarily a form of monologue, which establishes the dominant fictions of the society. Those who cannot participate in this monologue - including women, gays, and ethnic or racial minorities - often find themselves disenfranchised by their 'otherness.' The four gay artists whose photographs appear in this exhibition are all involved in finding subtle, distinct ways of subverting the patriarchal monologue and opening up possibilities of dialogue between the mainstream culture and those who are isolated by their 'difference.' Each of them combines text and image in a distinct way as part of that process. [...] The idea of gays as 'exotic' is exploded in SUNIL GUPTA'S series, 'Pretended: Family Relationships.' Combining images of inter-racial male couples with haiku-like poems by Stephen Dodd, these photos indicate that the idea of 'family' can extend beyond the preconceptions of heterosexual culture, both in terms of same-gender relations and across fictional racial boundaries."
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Box 109, found in the folder "Notes: MONO/DIA."